NICHIREN BUDDHISM ~ SGI

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GONGYO


NAM -  MYOHO -  RENGE -  KYO
                                DEVOTION TO THE LOTUS SUTRA                               BASICS »

"LET   THE   MYSTIC   LAW   OF   THE   UNITY   OF  CREATION   AND   MANIFESTATION  
FILL   MY   CONSCIOUSNESS   WITH   ETERNAL HAPPINESS   AND   GUIDE   MY   LIFE   AND    ACTIONS"


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LEADING GONGYO - LATEST VERSION:

Morning and evening gongyo follow the same format:
To begin, face the Gohonzon, sound the bell, and group chant Nam myoho renge kyo three times slowly.
This includes appreciation to the protective functions of the universe.

Recite the excerpt from the "Expedient Means" chapter. When finished, sound the bell.
Recite the verse section of the "Life Span" chapter. When finished, sound the bell

Here you begin fast chanting Nam myoho renge kyo.
Continue chanting for as long as you wish.
To conclude, sound the bell and group chant Nam myoho renge kyo three times.

Then offer these new silent prayers.

I offer my profound gratitude and appreciation to the Gohonzon, which embodies
Nam myoho renge kyo the essence of the Lotus Sutra.
I offer my profound gratitude and appreciation to Nichiren Daishonin, the Buddha of the Latter Day of the Law.
I offer my profound gratitude and appreciation to Nikko Shonin.
Solo Chant Nam myoho renge kyo - three times.

I offer my deepest appreciation for the three founding presidents of the Soka Gakkai Tsunesaburo Makiguchi, Josei Toda, and Daisaku Ikeda the eternal mentors of kosen rufu, for their selfless dedication to propagating the Law.
Solo Nam myoho renge kyo - three times.

I pray that the great vow for worldwide kosen rufu be fulfilled and that the Soka Gakkai International will develop in this endeavor for countless generations to come. I pray to accomplish my own human revolution, change my destiny, and fulfill all of my wishes. (+ additional prayers) I pray for my deceased relatives, fellow members, friends, and all those who have passed away, particularly for these individuals:
(Sound the bell continuously while offering prayers.)
Solo Chant Nam myoho renge kyo - three times

I pray for peace throughout the world and the happiness of all living beings.
Sound the bell and group chant Nam myoho renge kyo slowly three times to conclude.




~ TABLE OF CONTENTS ~

CHARTS:

DIAGRAM OF THE DAI-GOHONZON
DIAGRAM OF NAM-MYOHO-RENGE-KYO
EXTRA LARGE CHARTS




VERSIONS OF GONGYO:

HOBEN PLAIN TEXT»

JURYO PLAIN TEXT»

TEXT WITH CHINESE CHARACTERS
HOBEN CHAPTER
JURYO CHAPTER

TEXT WITH TRANSLATION
HOBEN CHAPTER
JURYO CHAPTER


ADDITIONAL SECTION OF JURYO CHAPTER
(CURRENTLY NOT IN USE... - WITH TRANSLATION)





GONGYO:

First Silent Prayer: I offer appreciation to the functions in life and the environment (shoten zenjin) that serve to protect us, and pray that these protective powers be further strengthened and enhanced through my practice of the Law. (Chant)

.Gongyo


2nd Silent Prayer:    I acknowledge my debt of gratitude and offer profound appreciation for the Dai-Gohonzon of the Three Great Secret Laws, which was bestowed upon the entire world; to Nichiren Daishonin, the Buddha of the Latter Day of the Law; and to Nikko Shonin.   I acknowledge my debt of gratitude and offer appreciation to Nichimoku Shonin. (Chant)

3rd Silent Prayer:     I pray that the great desire for kosen-rufu be fulfilled, and that the Soka Gakkai International develop in this endeavor for countless generations to come. I acknowledge my debt of gratitude and offer appreciation to the three founding presidents—Tsunesaburo Makiguchi, Josei Toda and Daisaku Ikeda—for their eternal examples of selfless dedication to the propagation of the Law. (Chant)

4th Silent Prayer:    I pray to bring forth Buddhahood from within my life and accomplish my own human revolution, change my destiny and fulfill my needs and wishes. (Offer additional prayers here.) I pray for my family and for all those who have passed away, (Mother, Father, Sisters, Brothers, Grandmothers, Grandfathers, Aunts, Uncles, Cousins, Friends) (Chant)

I pray for peace throughout the world and the happiness of every being.



TRANSLATION »                    NAM MYOHO RENGE KYO DIAGRAM »                            GOHONZON DIAGRAM »




EARLIER VERSION:

1st Silent Prayer:    I offer appreciation for the functions in life and the environment (shoten zenjin) that serve to protect us, and pray that these protective powers be further strengthened and enhanced through my practice of the Law. (Chant with Gongyo)

2nd Silent Prayer:    I acknowledge my debt of gratitude and offer profound appreciation for the Dai-Gohonzon of the Three Great Secret Laws, which was bestowed upon the entire world; to Nichiren Daishonin, the Buddha of the Latter Day of the Law; and to Nikko Shonin.   I acknowledge my debt of gratitude and offer appreciation to Nichimoku Shonin. (Chant)

3rd Silent Prayer:     I pray that the great desire for kosen-rufu be fulfilled, and that the Soka Gakkai International develop in this endeavor for countless generations to come. I acknowledge my debt of gratitude and offer appreciation to the three founding presidents—Tsunesaburo Makiguchi, Josei Toda and Daisaku Ikeda—for their eternal examples of selfless dedication to the propagation of the Law. (Chant)

4th Silent Prayer:    I pray to bring forth Buddhahood from within my life and accomplish my own human revolution, change my destiny and fulfill my needs and wishes. (Offer additional prayers here.) I pray for my family and for all those who have passed away, (Mother, Father, Sisters, Brothers, Grandmothers, Grandfathers, Aunts, Uncles, Cousins, Friends) (Chant)

I pray for peace throughout the world and the happiness of every being.

 

BASICS ... A Description of SGI Buddhism              Chaz Hawley

 

        In India, 2500 years ago Shakyamuni Buddha was seeking answers to the serious problems of life, especially the suffering, the crises, sickness and dying that we all still see today. He left the royal life he was born into, and spent years going through various extremely austere disciplines to try and reach a higher understanding, and finally it suddenly came to him while just sitting under a tree. This was comfortable, compared to long periods of fasting and immobilization. He called it the "Middle Way".

        His numerous teachings, or Sutras explained many aspects of the philosophy of enlightenment. In his last years, he taught the Lotus Sutra, which was the complete fundamentals of enlightenment. Over the centuries different schools and interpretations arose, focusing on various earlier sutras. They added ceremonies, they worshiped statues of Shakyamuni, and created a hierarchy of priests and monks.

        18 centuries later, in 13th century Japan, a Buddhist monk, Nichiren, searched all the sutras for the truest teachings. He found that the Lotus Sutra is the enlightenment as Shakyamuni intended. This teaching stresses that all people have an eternal Buddha Nature which can be immediately accessible to them. This Sutra, titled in Sanskrit, "Myo Ho Renge Kyo", stresses the importance of accessing the enlightenment of our Buddha Natures. This brings us benefits, happiness and compassion that guides us as we continue dealing with the many serious problems of life. We are not postponing our enlightenment for some distant future incarnation.

        The Lotus Sutra's title roughly translates: The Mystic Law of the Unity of True Cause and Effect. Nichiren added "Nam" or "Dedication" to the title, creating a statement of pure devotion towards our enlightenment. It is like saying: "I Let the Mystic Law of the Unity of True Cause and Effect fill my mind and guide my words and actions".

        Shakyamuni further stressed that, though it appeared he had suddenly attained enlightenment in that moment of his life, he realized he had always been enlightened!! This concept he defined as the "True Cause". This also being the True Cause for all of our Buddha Natures!! The power of affirming this when we chant Nam Myo Ho Renge Kyo is the pathway for transforming our minds away from the fundamental darkness of ordinary existence to the realization of our immortal perfection as Buddhas ourselves. So, like Shakyamuni, we also always existed in the state of True Enlightenment, and try to practice realizing this point.

        Nichiren created the Gohonzon to display a visual representation of the "Treasure Tower", or "Ceremony in the Air", as described in the Lotus Sutra. This is a graphic representation of Shakyamuni's greatest insights. It includes Nam Myo Ho Renge Kyo in bold characters down the middle, and many Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, and names of Heavenly Kings various Deities and other spirits that were included in the Lotus Sutra. It manifests the whole spectrum of all the states of Mind, or the "Ten Worlds", from the lowest to the highest. Like a mirror to our soul, it reflects the complete potential of our lives and therefore can be cherished not as an external object, but as our complete and innermost state.

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Arguing from the "Point Of Perfection"             Chaz Hawley

        In deepest mystical actuality are we not all Buddha? Our Buddha Nature makes us all One at that level, the Oneness of Cause and Effect. While growing up we have many experiences, and even now as we are experiencing our every day lives, we all are subjected to behaviors that come from the others in our lives. Yet are they not also Buddhas? Sure, if their behavior is imperfect, they are not aware of being Buddhas, or their behavior would be perfect. And if we were aware of our Oneness during the times when we were interacting, then our feelings, our reactions would be Buddha-like: wise, forgiving, loving, patient, compassionate and undisturbed.

        Should we not now, when we chant to experience the perfection of our Buddha Nature, our oneness with all around us, wouldn't that include looking back at our past with that same wise, loving, forgiving, compassionate understanding, and that would include no longer being disturbed by it? It was merely the mistaken behaviors of those, (including ourselves), who were ignorant or in denial of the Truth of our Oneness and Eternal Buddha Nature.

     The defense of our mortal separateness, the insistence on cherishing the seeming reality of our separate individual pasts, all the lower worlds, with all of their hurts and all of our grievances, this belief in these states being as valid as the higher ones, this belief is hurting us...all the attempts for the subdivision of our Oneness are hurting us.

        The mystical connection and Oneness of all our Buddha Natures, the striving for awareness of all our Beings in the Mystic Law, of our Highest Worlds, this striving lifts the burden of carrying our grievances and instead brings us happiness and peace. Forgiveness at this Mystical Level of Oneness gives us the ability to truly unburden ourselves of the traumatic accumulation of hurts, angers and grievances and stop the endless repeating patterns of behavior between ourselves and our friends, co-workers and family members.

        Campaigning for this means we have to clearly see what Truth is and what error is. The Truth is we are One with the Mystical Unity of Cause and Effect. Therefore, Perfect Cause: the Buddha Mind ... Perfect Effect: our Buddha Nature, and the Unity of Cause and Effect is our Oneness with our brothers, sisters, parents, children, friends, all the beings in our world. Error is the belief that we are seperate and the past can continue to hurt us.

      To reason from the Point Of Perfection of our Buddha Nature, and go to where we seem to be now, dwelling in which ever lower worlds and whatever that distance might be, this should make it clear that if we are experiencing anger and frustration and grievances, that can't really be the truth about our being. TheTruth has always been the Truth of our Oneness with the Buddha Mind, through Countless Lifetimes! The Unity of Cause-and-Effect has always been to makeTrue the Law of the Cause of Perfection on the Effects of Perfection. When Shakamuni realized this enlightenment, he realized he had always been enlightened!!

        To argue instead for the validity or reality of the mistaken behaviors of others who were unaware of their Buddha Nature, To try and deal with them psychologically, and these behaviors we extended towards them when we were ignorant of our Buddah Nature, those experiences of pain or frustration or negativity continue to occur when we deny our Buddha Nature and the Buddha Nature of those we are interacting with. Happiness is impossible then, enlightenment is impossible then.

        So the letting go of grievances is crucial yet can be helped greatly with the absolute certainty they are unreal compared with the Reality of the Higher Worlds. Grievances are a lie about our true Buddha Selves and the true Buddha Selves of others that we are actually One with. Experience Oneness, Experience Happiness!! This should be the emphasis of my practice.

 

                                              ~ How To Become One With Unlimited Self Esteem ~
                                                    By Danny Nagashima, SGI USA General Director


        You can analyze your situation all you want. You have to get to the root of why "I don't believe in the greatness of my life". You have to grab it by the roots and yank it out of your life. The answer is probably so simple, but we tend to over-analyze, it gets complicated and the solution seems far away. Your mission as a Buddhist is to become happy not to master suffering. We have the negative and positive sides of us one says, "who are you kidding", the other, "you can do it". You have to fight to not to give in to your negativity. This is not about being a writer, an artist, an actor, etc. It is about becoming the man or woman that you always wanted to become, a man or woman who really values his/her life.

        The obstacles you face are the answers to your prayer.

        Those feelings of self-doubt, those feelings that "I am a failure" those are the feelings that I have to face and to address. How you feel about yourself, that feeling of self-loathing, of not being good enough, of being a sham. Those are the feelings you have to face. Your talent is not being questioned; it is about how you feel about yourself. That is the karma. You have to value your own life, to appreciate that it has nothing to do with anybody else validating you. Follow your heart; follow your Buddhahood and the effect from that, the benefit from that will be massive.

        You need to follow your heart, truly treasure your life.


        When Nichiren Daishonin inscribed the Gohonzon, he was already chanting daimoku out of the greatness of his life, his Buddhahood, his enlightened state; he inscribed the Gohonzon for all humanity so that everyone could relieve his or her suffering. When you sit in front of the Gohonzon and chant, you have to have the most reverence for your life, the same as the Daishonin's; therefore your life deserves that kind of reverence. If you chant for two weeks to really be a person of unlimited self-esteem and to really, truly appreciate your life including your flaws, your accomplishments, your defeats and your losses, your victories, all that you have created and to truly appreciate your talent as XYZ for two weeks, everything will change.

        Forget about the past garbage. Put it away.

        That will only make you feel impotent. From today on, really chant about being that man/woman of unlimited self-esteem. Really appreciate everything about your life; all the things that make you incredibly unique and wonderful. All your sufferings, problems, heartaches, will be the stuff you need, in order to share your experience, to encourage and to inspire others.

        Focus on really, truly awakening to your greatness.

        This is the opportunity (sufferings, obstacles, lack of self-esteem) you needed to go through in order to become outrageously successful so you can fulfill your dream. If you focus on this really valuing your life now, then everything will fall into place in a much bigger way. This is something no one can give you; the universe is showing you what you need to tackle. When you first chant this way, a lot of garbage may come out of your life, a lot of negativity, awful feelings may surface. We always bring into our lives what matches our life condition.

          So chant to feel incredible joy about your worth and you will feel and know self worth and greatness.

        You not being able to do whatever you determine is a manifestation deep down of your feeling of fear, that you are not good enough, that you do not have it in you. You must get yourself to a place where there is the greatness of your life, then everything will be transformed. We have to believe in our Buddhahood. When we face the Gohonzon, we should say, "I am going to praise my wonderful life".

          It is important to awaken to your own greatness.

         Your life is the Gohonzon. Now is the time for you to start over. When you pray to a deity, your prayer becomes passive. Our voice is the Mystic Law. This law is not outside of you. When you get a benefit, it was you who created it. You must awaken to your greatness, appreciate and value your own life. It is no different to the enlightened life of Nichiren Daishonin, embodied in the Gohonzon.

        Just as a beautiful piece of art elicits a response, or a great book touches your life in a certain way, we must elicit the Buddha nature from our own lives. It is right here, and the Gohonzon is the perfect vehicle to bring out that strength, joy and vibrant life condition; then you take that to the world and change the environment. We are not necessarily chanting for the house, the car, the job, the relationship, but we are chanting to elevate our life condition to attract that happiness. The results that we see in our lives are a reflection of our life condition.

     Every day as you chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo consciously call forth your Buddhahood to manifest itself consistently.

     Chant to rise above your basic tendency of disbelief, or continually thinking that you are a common mortal who does not deserve good fortune in this life. Do not negate your life when you sit in front of the Gohonzon. Do not beg. Do not scream. Do not berate the Gohonzon. Believe in the greatness of your life; manifest the extraordinary side of you. The Gohonzon is the tool we need to bring out our Buddhahood.

     My life is the Gohonzon. Do not slander your life.

     The doubt is necessary to prove to myself that "I am a Buddha. I will fulfill every one of my dreams for myself". We already possess something incredible our Buddha nature, the Gohonzon. But we do not believe that the good fortune, the "million dollars" is truly ours. We will not be able to get it, or to enjoy it. Trust that the Gohonzon, your prayer, is the absolute means for you to transform your life. Trust and faith are the key words.

        Chant with the expectation that every one of your wildest dreams will be fulfilled beyond your wildest imagination.


        Chant to believe in your Buddhahood. Trust in the greatness of your life. In "On Attaining Buddhahood", Nichiren Daishonin made a primary point: to free ourselves from the suffering of birth and death which we have endured in lifetime after lifetime, and to attain absolute happiness, we need to awaken to the mystic truth that has always been within our lives. That truth is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. That truth is "I am a Buddha". Trust that you have everything you need for your happiness.


                                               TEN POINTS TO BECOME A PERSON OF UNLIMITED SELF-ESTEEM

1. Chant to become a person of unlimited self-esteem

2. Chant to awaken to your own greatness

3. Chant to appreciate your life, including flaws, accomplishments defeats, losses, and victories and truly appreciate all that makes you a unique and wonderful person

4. Chant to make the impossible possible

5. Chant to consistently manifest your Buddha nature and rise above your basic tendencies and overcome the inherent negativities in your life

6. Believe that you are a Buddha and create all the benefits for yourself

7. Believe you are the Gohonzon

8. Trust that in the Gohonzon, you have the means to fulfill each and every desire to become extraordinarily happy

9. Chant to display your Buddhahood and to bring forth that strength, joy, vibrant life condition

10. And then take it to the world and change the environment

History of Nichiren Shoshu from Bill:

Many of us supported the Temple. While under construction, men and YMD would spend the night 40 miles away to guard against vandals, etc. Sensei encouraged oneness of laity and priest. SGI built and contributed dozens of temples.

Then they eliminated Sensei's position as leader of all lay Nichiren organizations They then excommunicated all who did not follow the high priest, which came to about 12,000,000 SGI members worldwide. About 5% stayed with the temple. Temple says High Priest is direct representative of Daishonin, and as such, is the enlightened one. Enlightenment is only possible through the High Priest. I've read many HP speeches. They look a lot like Sensei"s, until they mention the "Devil Ikeda". They basically deny the possibility of enlightenment unless you get the blessing of the HP. They are now launching proselytizing efforts to fundamentally destroy the Gakkai. Most religions promote leading good lives. Most regard divinity as separate from people, but still work towards good will, Temple puts HP as gate to enlightenment, and attacks SGI and Sensei as devilish. We can work side by side with other religions and peace movements. The temple is fighting to destroy the fundamentals of Nichiren Daishonin and the Lotus sutra. It is important to study the Gosho and Sensei's guidance to understand deeply what the Gohonzon is and what the Daishonin teaches. That's the short answer. The World Tribune and Living Buddhism are essential to keeping us on the correct path to enlightenment and Kosen Rufu. Soka Spirit (Sunita's meeting) is the front lines of countering the Temple's destructive efforts. 


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SGI CORE BUDDHIST CONCEPTS »       

Articles On Aging & Youthfullness »   1    2    3


METAPHYSICAL SIGNIFICANCE of the Lotus Sutra »

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 GONGYO: Plain Text:
Hoben Chapter:

Myo ho ren ge kyo.  
Ho ben pon. Dai ni.

Ni ji se son.    Ju san mai.
An jo ni ki.    Go shari hotsu.

Sho but chi e.   Jin jin mur yo.
Go chi e mon.    Nan ge nan nyu.

Is sai sho mon.   Hyaku shi butsu.
Sho fu no chi.    Sho i sha ga.

Butsu zo shin gon.   Hyaku sen man noku.
Mu shu sho butsu.   Jin gyo sho butsu.

Mur yo do ho.    Yum yo sho jin.
Myo sho fu mon.    Jo jeu jin jin.

Mi zo u ho.    Zui gi sho setsu.
Is hu nan ge.   Shari hotsu.

Go jeu jo butsu ir ai.    Shu jeu in nen.
Shu jeu hi yu.    Ko en gon kyo.

Mu shu ho ben.    In do shu jo.
Ryo ri sho jaku.   Sho i sha ga.

Nyo rai ho ben.    Chi ken hara mitsu.
Kai i gu soku.   Shari hotsu.

 



Nyo rai chi ken.    Ko dai jin non.
Mur yo mu ge.   Riki. Mu sho i. Zen jo.

Ge das. San mai.    Jin nyu mu sai.
Jo jeu is sai.    Mi zo u ho.

Shari hotsu. Nyo rai no.    Shu jeu fun betsu.
Gyo ses sho ho.    Gon ji nyu nan.

Ek ka shu shin.    Shari hotsu.
Shu yo gon shi.    Mu ryo mu hen.

Mi zo u ho.    Bus shitsu jo jeu.
Shi shari hotsu.    Fu shu bu setsu.

Sho i sha ga.    Bus sho jo jeu.
Dai ichi ke u.    Nan ge shi ho.
Yui butsu yo butsu.    Nai no ku jin.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3X
Sho ho jis so.    Sho i sho ho.
Nyo ze so.    Nyo ze sho.
Nyo ze tai.    Nyo ze riki.

Nyo ze sa.    Nyo ze in.
Nyo ze en.    Nyo ze ka.
Nyo ze ho.    Nyo ze hon mak ku kyo to.

Juryo Chapter [4X2 Phraising]:

Myo ho ren ge kyo. Nyo rai ju ryo hon.
Dai ju roku.

Ji ga toku bur rai. Sho kyo sho
kos shu. Mur yo hyaku sen man. Oku
sai as ogi. Jo sep po kyo
ke. Mu shu oku shu jo. Ryo nyu
o butsu do. Ni rai mur yo ko.

I do shu jo ko. Ho ben gen
ne han. Ni jitsu fu metsu do. Jo
jeu shi seppo. Ga jo jeu o
shi. I sho jin zu riki. Ryo ten
do shu jo. Sui gon ni fu ken.

Shu ken ga metsu do. Ko ku yo
sha ri. Gen kai e ren bo.  Ni
sho katsu go shin. Shu jo ki shin
buku. Shichi   jiki   i   nyu nan. Is shin
yok ken butsu. Fu ji shaku shin myo.

Ji ga gyu shu so. Ku shutsu ryo
jeu sen. Ga ji go shu jo. Jo
zai shi fu metsu. I ho ben rik
ko. Gen u metsu fu metsu. Yo koku
u shu jo. Ku gyo shin gyo sha.

Ga bu o hi chu. I setsu mu
jo ho. Nyo to fu mon shi. Tan
ni ga metsu do. Ga ken sho shu
jo. Motsu zai o ku kai. Ko fu
i gen shin. Ryo go sho katsu go.

In go shin ren bo. Nai shutsu i
sep po. Jin zu riki nyo ze. O
as ogi ko. Jo zai ryo jeu
sen. Gyu yo sho jeu sho. Shu jo
ken ko jin. Dai ka sho sho ji.

 


Ga shi do an non. Ten nin jo
jeu man. On rin sho do kaku. Shu
jeu ho sho gon. Ho jeu ta ke
ka. Shu jo sho yu raku. Sho ten
gyaku ten ku. Jo sas shu gi gaku.

U man da ra ke. San butsu gyu
dai shu. Ga jo do fu ki. Ni
shu ken sho jin. U fu sho ku no. *
Nyo ze shitsu jeu man.
Ze sho zai
shu jo. I aku go in nen. Ka
as o gi ko. Fu mon san bo
myo. Sho u shu ku doku. Nyu wa
shichi jiki sha. Sok kai ken ga shin.

Zai shi ni sep po. Waku ji i
shi shu. Setsu butsu ju mur yo. Ku
nai ken bus sha. I setsu butsu nan
chi. Ga chi riki nyo ze. Ek o
sho mur yo. Jum yo mu shu ko.

Ku shu go sho toku. Nyo to u
chi sha. Mot to shi sho gi. To
dan ryo yo jin.  Butsu go jip pu
ko. Nyo i zen ho ben.  I ji
o shi ko. Jitsu zai ni gon shi.

Mu no sek ko mo. Ga yaku i
se bu. Ku sho ku gen sha. I
bon bu ten do. Jitsu zai ni gon
metsu. I jo ken ga ko. Ni sho kyo *
shi shin. Ho itsu jaku go yoku. Da
o aku do chu. Ga jo chi shu
jo. Gyo do fu gyo do. Zui o
sho ka do. I ses shu jeu ho.

Mai ji sa ze nen. I ga ryo
shu jo. Toku nyu mu jo do.
Soku jo jeu bus shin.

Juryo Chapter [Traditional Phraising]:

Myo ho ren ge kyo. Nyo rai ju ryo hon.
Dai ju roku.

Ji ga toku bur rai.    Sho kyo sho kos shu.
Mur yo hyaku sen man.    Oku sai as ogi.

Jo sep po kyo ke.    Mu shu oku shu jo.
Ryo nyu o butsu do.    Ni rai mur yo ko.

I do shu jo ko.    Ho ben gen ne han.
Ni jitsu fu metsu do.    Jo jeu shi seppo.

Ga jo jeu o shi.    I sho jin zu riki.
Ryo ten do shu jo.    Sui gon ni fu ken.

Shu ken ga metsu do.    Ko ku yo sha ri.
Gen kai e ren bo.    Ni sho katsu go shin.

Shu jo ki shin buku.    Shichi jiki i nyu nan.
Is shin yok ken butsu.    Fu ji shaku shin myo.

Ji ga gyu shu so.    Ku shutsu ryo jeu sen.
Ga ji go shu jo.    Jo zai shi fu metsu.

I ho ben rik ko.    Gen u metsu fu metsu.
Yo koku u shu jo.    Ku gyo shin gyo sha.

Ga bu o hi chu.    I setsu mu jo ho.
Nyo to fu mon shi.    Tan ni ga metsu do.

Ga ken sho shu jo.    Motsu zai o ku kai.
Ko fu i gen shin.    Ryo go sho katsu go.

In go shin ren bo.    Nai shutsu i sep po.
Jin zu riki nyo ze.    O as o gi ko.

Jo zai ryo jeu sen.    Gyu yo sho jeu sho.
Shu jo ken ko jin.    Dai ka sho sho ji.

Ga shi do an non.    Ten nin jo jeu man.
On rin sho do kaku.    Shu jeu ho Sho gon.

 

 


Ga shi do an non.    Ten nin jo jeu man.
On rin sho do kaku.    Shu jeu ho Sho gon.

Ho jeu ta ke ka.    Shu jo sho yu raku.
Sho ten gyaku ten ku.    Jo sas shu gi gaku.

U man da ra ke.    San butsu gyu dai shu.
Ga jo do fu ki.    Ni shu ken sho jin.

U fu sho ku no.    Nyo ze shitsu jeu man.

Ze sho zai shu jo.    I aku go in nen.
Ka as o gi ko.    Fu mon san bo myo.

Sho u shu ku doku.    Nyu wa shichi jiki sha.
Sok kai ken ga shin.    Zai shi ni sep po.

Waku ji i shi shu.    Setsu butsu ju mur yo.
Ku nai ken bus sha.    I setsu butsu nan chi.

Ga chi riki nyo ze.    Eko sho mur yo.
Jum yo mu shu ko.    Ku shu go sho toku.

Nyo to u chi sha.    Mot to shi sho gi.
To dan ryo yo jin.    Butsu go jip pu ko.

Nyo i zen ho ben.    I ji o shi ko.
Jitsu zai ni gon shi.    Mu no sek ko mo.

Ga yaku i se bu.    Ku sho ku gen sha.
I bon bu ten do.    Jitsu zai ni gon metsu.

I jo ken ga ko.    Ni sho kyo shi shin.
Ho itsu jaku go yoku.    Da o aku do chu.

Ga jo chi shu jo.    Gyo do fu gyo do.
Zui o sho ka do.    I ses shu jeu ho.

Mai ji sa ze nen.    I ga ryo shu jo.
Toku nyu mu jo do.    Soku jo jeu bus shin.

 



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                        Traditional Gongyo w/ Chinese Characters                      

Hoben Chapter

Gongyo Gongyo



 Juryo Chapter:  


Gongyo Gongyo

Gongyo

Gongyo



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                                                             Gongyo with Translation:                                                                

Hoben Chapter:

Myo ho ren ge kyo. Ho ben pon. Dai ni.

Identifies the excerpt to come as the Hoben Chapter of the Lotus Sutra.

Niji seson. Ju sanmai. Anjo ni ki. Go shari-hotsu. Sho-but-chi-e. Jinjin muryo. Go chi-e mon. Nange nannyu. Issai shomon. Hyaku-shi-butsu. Sho fu no chi.

At this time the World-Honored One serenely arose from meditation and addressed Shariputra: "The wisdom of all Buddhas is infinitely profound and immeasurable. The portal to this wisdom is difficult to understand and difficult to enter. Neither men of Learning (shomon) nor men of Realization (engaku) are able to comprehend it."

Sho-i sha ga. Butsu zo shingon. Hyaku sen man noku. Mushu sho butsu. Jin gyo sho-butsu. Muryo doho. Yumyo shojin. Myosho fu mon. Joju jinjin. Mi-zo-u ho. Zui gi sho setsu. Ishu nange.

"The reason is this. A Buddha has carried out countless austerities under many hundred thousand myriads of kotis of Buddhas. He devoted himself to these practices so valiantly and untiringly that his name is universally known. He realized the profound, unparalleled Law and preaches it according to the people's capacity, yet his intention is very difficult to understand."

Shari-hotsu. Go ju jo-butsu irai. Shuju innen. Shuju hiyu. Ko en gonkyo. Mu shu hoben. Indo shujo. Ryo ri sho jaku.

"Shariputra, ever since I attained Buddhahood, I have widely expounded my teachings through many stories of past relationships and many parables, and by countless means have led the people to renounce all their attachments.

Sho-i sha ga. Nyorai hoben. Chiken hara-mitsu. Kai i gu-soku.

The reason for this is that the Tathágata is possessed of both means and perfect wisdom."

Shari-hotsu. Nyorai chiken. Kodai jinnon. Muryo muge. Riki. Mu-sho-i. Zenjo. Gedas. Sanmai. Jin nyu musai. Joju issai. Mi-zo-u ho.

"Shariputra, the wisdom of the Tathágata is all-encompassing and profound. His mercy is infinite, and his teaching knows no bounds. Endowed with power, fearlessness, concentration, emancipation [from sufferings and desires] and the capacity to meditate, he dwells in the boundless and awakens to the never before-realized Law."

Shari-hotsu. Nyorai no. Shuju fun-betsu. Gyo ses sho ho. Gonji nyunan. Ekka shushin. Shari-hotsu. Shu yo gon shi. Muryo muhen. Mi-zo-u ho. Bus^shitsu joju.

"Shariputra, the Tathágata has the power to perceive which among the various teachings [is suited to his audience], to preach the teachings in a skillful way, and to gladden the hearts of the people with warm and tender words. That is to say, Shariputra, the Buddha has realized the infinite, boundless and unparalleled Law."

Shi shari-hotsu. Fu shu bu setsu. Sho-i sha ga. Bus sho joju. Dai ichi ke-u. Nange shi ho.

"Shariputra, I will say no more, because that which the Buddha has achieved is the rarest and most difficult Law to comprehend."

Yui butsu yo butsu. Nai no kujin. Shoho jisso. Sho-i shoho. Nyo ze so. Nyo ze sho. Nyo ze tai. Nyo ze riki. Nyo ze sa. Nyo ze in. Nyo ze en. Nyo ze ka. Nyo ze ho. Nyo ze honmak kukyo to.

"The true entity of all phenomena can only be understood and shared between Buddhas. This reality consists of appearance, nature, entity, power, influence, internal cause, relation, latent effect, manifest effect, and their consistency from beginning to end."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Juryo Chapter:

Myo ho ren ge kyo. Nyo rai ju ryo hon. Dai ju roku.

Identifies the excerpt to come as the Juryo Chapter of the Lotus Sutra.

Ji ga toku bur rai. Sho kyo sho kosshu. Muryo hyaku sen man. Oku sai asogi. Jo seppo kyoke Mushu oku shujo. Ryo nyu o butsu-do. Nirai muryo ko.

At that time the World-Honored One, desiring to emphasize this teaching once more, spoke in verse.

"Since I attained Buddhahood, countless aeons have passed, a hundred, thousand, ten thousand, hundred thousand, asogi aeons. I have taught the Law continuously during these countless aeons and caused infinite millions to enter on the road to Buddhahood."

I do shujo ko. Hoben gen nehan. Ni jitsu fu metsu-do. Jo ju shi seppo.

"I let the people witness my nirvana as a means to save them, but in truth I do not die; I am here always, teaching the Law."

Ga jo ju o shi. I sho jin-zu-riki. Ryo tendo shujo. Sui gon ni fu ken.

"I am here always, yet because of my mystic powers the deluded people cannot see me even when I am close by."

Shu ken ga metsu-do. Ko kuyo shari. Gen kai e renbo. Ni sho katsu-go shin.

"When the people witness my passing, they pay widespread reverence to my relics. All of them harbor thoughts of yearning, and in their hearts a thirst for me is born."

Shujo ki shin-buku. Shichi-jiki i nyunan. Isshin yok ken butsu. Fu ji shaku shinmyo. Ji ga gyu shuso. Ku shutsu ryojusen.

"When they have become truly faithful, honest and upright, gentle in mind, single-mindedly yearning to see the Buddha, not begrudging their lives to do so, then I and the assembly of monks appear together on Eagle Peak."

Ga ji go shujo. Jo zai shi fu-metsu. I hoben-rik ko. Gen u metsu fu-metsu. Yo-koku u shujo. Kugyo shingyo sha. Ga bu o hi chu. I setsu mujo ho.

"Then I tell the people that I am always here never dying, that l seem at times to live, at times to die, merely as all expedient means. If there are those in other worlds who are reverent and sincere in faith, among them also I teach the highest Law of all."

Nyoto fu mon shi. Tan ni ga metsu-do. Ga ken sho shujo. Motsu-zai o kukai. Ko fu i gen shin. Ryo go sho katsu-go. In go shin renbo. Nai shutsu i seppo.

"But you refuse to heed my words and insist upon thinking that I die. I see the mass of people drowned in a sea of woe, and for that reason I do not show myself, causing them to thirst for me. When their hearts commence to yearn, I appear to once to teach the Law."

Jin-zu riki nyo ze. O asogi ko. Jo zai ryo jusen. Gyu yo sho jusho. Shujo ken ko jin. Dai ka sho sho ji. Ga shi do annon. Tennin jo juman. Onrin sho do-kaku. Shuju ho Shogon. Hoju ta keka. Shujo sho yu-raku. Soten gyaku tenku. Jo sas shu gi-gaku. U mandara ke. San butsu gyu daishu. Ga jodo bu ki. Ni shu ken sho jin. Ufu sho kuno. Nyo ze shitsu juman.

"Such are my mystic powers. For innumerable kotis of aeons I have always been on Eagle Peak and have lived in various other lands When men witness the end of an aeon and all is consumed in a great fire, this, my land, remains safe and unharmed, constantly filled with gods and men. The halls and palaces in its gardens and groves are adorned with all kinds of gems. Precious trees bear plentiful flowers and fruit, and the people there are happy and at ease. The gods strike heavenly drums making a ceaseless symphony of sound. A rain of white mandara blossoms scatters over the Buddha and the people. My pure land is indestructible yet men see it as consumed in fire, filled with sorrow fear and woe, a place of countless troubles."

Ze sho zai shujo. I aku-go innen. Ka asogi ko. Fu mon sanbo myo.

"These people with their various crimes, because of the effects of their evil deeds, will never even hear the name of the three treasures, though countless aeons go by."

Sho u shu ku-doku. Nyuwa shichi-jiki sha. Sokkai ken gashin. Zai shi ni seppo. Waku-ji i shi shu. Setsu butsu-ju muryo. Ku nai ken bussha. I setsu butsu nan chi.

"But those who follow meritorious ways, who are gentle, peaceful and upright, all of them will see me here in person, teaching the Law. At times I will teach these people the immeasurable length of the Buddha's life, and to those who see me only after a long while I will explain how difficult it is to meet the Buddha."

Ga chi-riki nyo ze. Eko sho muryo. Jumyo mushu ko. Ku shugo sho toku.

"Such is the power of my wisdom that it illuminates infinitely far. This life that endures for countless aeons I gained as the result of lengthy practice."

Nyoto u chi sha. Mot^to shi sho gi. To dan ryo yo jin. Butsu-go jip puko. Nyo i zen hoben. I ji o shi ko. Jitsu zai ni gon shi. Mu no sek komo. Ga yaku i se bu. Ku sho kugen sha.

"You men of wisdom, rid yourselves of all doubts about this! Cut them off once and for all. The Buddha's words are true not false, He is like the skilled physician suing some devices to cure his deluded children. He lives but tells them he has died. No one can call his teaching false. I am the father of this world, saving those who are suffering and afflicted."

I bonbu tendo. Jitsu zai ni gon metsu. I joken ga ko. Ni sho kyoshi shin. Ho-itsu jaku go-yoku. Da o aku-do chu. Ga jo chi shujo. Gyo do fu gyo do. Zui o sho ka do. I ses shuju ho.

"Because of the delusions of ordinary people, I say I have departed though in fact I live, for if they see me constantly, arrogance and selfishness arise in their hearts, Abandoning themselves to the five desires, they fall into the paths of evil. I am ever aware of which people practice the Way, and which do not."

Mai ji sa ze nen. I ga ryo shujo. Toku nyu mu-jo do. Soku joju busshin.

"This is my constant thought: how I can cause all living beings to gain entry to the highest Way and quickly attain Buddhahood."


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                 Additional Part Of Juryo Chapter (No longer in daily use, With Translation)                    

- This part precedes the above part of Juryo Chapter -


Niji butsu go. Sho bo-satsu gyo. Issai daishu. Sho zen-nanshi. Nyoto to shinge. Nyorai jotai shi go. Bu go daishu. Nyoto to shinge. Nyorai jotai shi go. U bu go. Sho daishu, Nyoto to shinge. Nyorai jotai shi go. Zeji bo-satsu daishu. Mi-roku i shu. Gassho byaku butsu gon. Seson. Yui gan ses shi. Gato to shinju butsu-go. Nyo ze san byaku i. Bu gon. Yui gan ses shi. Gato to shinju butsu-go

"At this time the Buddha addressed the bodhisattvas and all the multitude: "Men of devout faith, believe and understand the true words of the Tathágata" Again the Buddha addressed the people: "Believe and understand the true words of Tathágata." "At this time the bodhisattvas and the multitude beginning with Miroku, pressed their palms together and said: "World-Honored One, our only wish is that you teach us. Certainly we will believe the Buddhas words. Thus they spoke three times, repeating the words. " Our only wish is that you teach us. Certainly we will believe the Buddha's words.

Niji seson. Chi sho bo-satsu. San sho fu shi. Ni go shi gon. Nyoto tai cho. Nyorai hi-mitsu. Jinzu shi riki.

When the World Honored One says that the bodhisattvas repeated their petition three times and more without ceasing he addressed them "Listen well and hear the Tathágata’s secret and his mystic power."

Issai seken. Tennin gyu. Ashura. Kai i kon shaka-muni-butsu. Shus shaku-shi gu. Ko gayajo. fu on. Za o dojo. Toku a-noku-ta-ra san-myaku sanbodai. Nen zen-nanshi. Ga jitsu jo-butsu irai. Muryo muhen. Hyaku sen man noku. Nayuta ko.

"All gods, men and asutras of this world believe that after leaving the palace of the Shakyas, Shakyamuni Buddha seated himself at the place of meditation not far from the city of Gaya and attained the supreme enlightenment. However, men of devout faith, the time is limitless and boundless -- a hundred, thousand, ten thousand, hundred thousand, nayuta aeons -- since I in fact attained Buddhahood."

Hi nyo go hyaku sen man noku. Nayuta. Asogi. Sanzen dai sen sekai. Ke shi u nin. Matchi mijin. Ka o tobo. Go hyaku sen man noku. Nayuta. Asogi koku. Nai ge ichi-jin. Nyo ze to gyo. Jin ze mijin. Sho zen-nanshi. O i unga. Ze sho sekai. Ka toku shiyui. Kyokei chi go. Shu fu.

"Suppose there is one who reduces five hundred, thousand, ten thousand, hundred thousand, nayuta (1011) asogi (1059) major world systems to particles of dust, and then takes them all toward the east, dropping one particle each time he traverses five hundred, thousand, ten thousand, hundred thousand, nayuta, asogi worlds. Suppose that he continues traveling eastward in this way, until he has finished dropping all the particles. Men of devout faith, what is your opinion? Can the total number of all those worlds be imagined or calculated ?"

Mi-roku bo-sat to. Ku byaku butsu gon. Seson. Ze sho sekai. Muryo muhen. Hi sanju sho chi. Yaku hi shin-riki sho gyu. Issai shomon. Hyaku-shi-butsu. I murochi. Fu no shiyui. Chi go genshu. Gato ju. A-yui-ot-chi-ji. O ze ji chu. Yaku sho fu das seson. Nyo ze sho sekai. Muryo muhen. Niji butsu go. Dai bosas shu. Sho zen-nanshi. Konto funmyo. Sengo nyoto. Ze sho sekai. Nyaku jaku mijin. Gyu fu jaku sha. Jin ni i jin. Ichi-jin ikko. Ga jo-butsu irai. Bu ka o shi. Hyaku sen man noku. Nayuta. Asogi ko.

Bodhisattva Miroku and the others said to the Buddha " World Honored One, these worlds are infinite and boundless. They are beyond calculation. They exceed the power of the imagination. Neither men of Learning nor men of Realization even with their illusion-free wisdom could imagine or calculate the number. Although we are now at the stage where we will never backslide in faith we are totally incapable of comprehending this, World-Honored One, these worlds are infinite and boundless." Then the Buddha addressed the great bodhisattvas: "Now, men of devout faith I clearly proclaim to you. Suppose all these worlds, whether they received a particle or not are once more reduced to dust. Let one particle represent one aeon. Then the time which has passed since I attained Buddhahood suppose this by one hundred, thousand, ten thousand, hundred thousand, nayuta, asogi aeons."

Ji ju ze rai. Ga jo zai shi. Shaba sekai. Seppo kyoke. Yaku o yosho. Hyaku sen man noku. Nayuta. Asogi koku. Dori shujo.

"Ever since then I have been constantly in this world expounding the Law and instructing [the people]. Also I have led and benefited the people in one hundred thousand, ten thousand hundred thousand nayuta asogi other worlds."

Sho zen-nanshi. O ze chugen. Ga setsu nen-do-but to. U bu gon go. Nyu o nehan. Nyo ze kai i Hoben fun-betsu.

"Men of devout faith during this time I taught people about Nento Buddha and others saying that I would end all sufferings and pass away. All this I did through different methods of teaching that were suited to the capacity of the people."

Sho zen-nanshi. Nyaku u shujo. Raishi ga sho. Ga i butsu-gen. Kan go shin to. Sho kon ridon. Zui sho o do. Shosho ji setsu. Myoji fudo. Nenki daisho. Yaku-bu gen gon. To nyu nehan. U i shuju hoben. Setsu mimyo ho. No ryo shujo. Hok kangi shin.

"Men of devout faith, when the people came to me, I perceived with the eyes of a Buddha the degree of their faith and other qualities depending upon whether their capacities were keen or dull. I made my appearance teaching in many different worlds using different names, and explaining how long a period my teaching would be efficacious. On other occasions when I made my advent I told the people that I would soon enter nirvana, and employed many methods to expound the wonderful teachings and caused the people to be gladdened their hearts."

Sho zen-nanshi. Nyorai ken sho shujo. Gyo o shobo. Toku hak-ku ju sha. I ze nin setsu. Ga sho shukke. Toku a-noku-ta-ra. San-myaku sanbodai. Nen ga jitsu. Jo-butsu irai. Ku-on nyaku shi. Tan ni hoben. Kyoke shujo. Ryo nyu butsu-do. Sa nyo ze setsu.

"Men of devout faith, I the Tathágata, observed that the people delighted in inferior teachings and were meager in virtue and weighted down by defilement. Therefore I taught them that I had renounced the world in my youth and later attained enlightenment. But in truth the time since I attained Buddhahood is the tremendously long period I have already revealed. This was only an expedient I used to teach the people and cause them to enter on the path to Buddhahood."

Sho zen-nanshi. Nyorai sho en kyoden Kai i dodas shujo. Waku sek koshin. Waku set tashin. Waku ji koshin. Waku ji tashin. Waku ji koji. Waku ji taji. Sho sho gon-setsu. Kai jitsu fu ko.

"Men of devout faith the sutras which the Tathágata expounded are all for the purpose of saving people from their sufferings. Sometimes I spoke of myself sometimes of others; sometimes I presented myself, sometimes others; sometimes I showed my own actions sometimes those of others. All my doctrines are true and none are false."

Sho-i sha ga. Nyorai nyojit chiken. Sangai shi so. Mu u shoji. Nyaku tai nyaku shutsu. Yaku mu zai-se. Gyu metsu-do sha. Hi jitsu hi ko. Hi nyo hi i. Fu nyo sangai. Ken no sangai. Nyo shi shi ji. Nyorai myo ken. Mu u shaku-myo.

"The reason is that the Tathágata perceives the true aspect of the threefold word exactly as it is. There is no ebb and flow of birth and death nor life in this world and later extinction. It is neither substantial nor empty neither consistent nor diverse. Nor is it what those who dwell in the threefold world perceive it to be. All such things the Tathágata sees clear and without error."

I sho shujo. U shuju sho. Shuju yoku. Shuju gyo. Shuju oku-so. Fun-bek ko. Yoku ryo sho sho zengon. I nyakkan innen. Hiyu gonji. Shuju seppo. Shosa butsu-ji . Mi zo zan pai .

"People have differing natures, differing desires, differing modes of behavior, and differing ideas and outlooks. Therefore out of my desire to plant the seeds of enlightenment in their hearts I have taught the various teachings through stories of past relationships parables and other sayings. This practice proper to a Buddha I have continued unceasingly."

Nyo ze. Ga jo-butsu irai. Jindai ku-on. Jumyo muryo. Asogi ko. Joju fu-metsu. Sho zen-nanshi. Ga hon gyo bo-satsu do. Sho jo jumyo. Kon yu mi jin. Bu bai jo shu. Nen kon hi jitsu metsu-do. Ni ben sho gon. To shu metsu-do. Nyorai i ze hoben. Kyoke shujo.

"Since I attained Buddhahood an unimaginably long period has passed. The length of my life is infinite aeons. My life has always existed and shall never end. Men of devout faith, once I also practiced the bodhisattva austerities, and the life, which I then acquired, has yet to be exhausted. My life will last yet twice as many aeons from now. Although I never really pass away I predict my own death. With this means, the Tathágata teaches the people."

Sho-i sha ga Nyaku buk-ku-ju o se. Haku-toku shi nin. Fu shu zengon. Bingu gesen. Ton-jaku go-yoku Nyu o oku-so. Moken mo chu. Nyakken nyorai. Jo zai fu-metsu. Ben ki kyoshi. Ni e endai. Fu no sho o. Nanzo shi so. Kugyo shi shin.

"The reason is this If the Buddha remains in the world too long those people with shallow virtue will not be able to accumulate the good fortune necessary to attain enlightenment. They will fall into poverty and debasement. Greedy with the five desires they will be caught in the snares of deluded thoughts and ideas. By seeing the Tathágata constantly present and undying in this world, they will become arrogant and selfish and will neglect their practice of Buddhism. They will fail to realize how difficult it is to meet the Tathágata and will feel no reverence for him."

Ze ko nyorai. I hoben setsu. Bi-ku to chi. Shobus^shus-se. Nan ka chigu. Sho-i sha ga. Sho haku-toku nin. Ka muryo. Hyaku sen man nok-ko. Waku u ken butsu. Waku fu ken sha. I shiji ko. Ga sa ze gon. Sho bi-ku. Nyorai nan ka tokken. Shi shujo to. Mon nyo ze go. Hit^to sho o. Nanzo shi so. Shin ne renbo. Katsu-go o butsu. Ben shu zengon. Ze ko nyorai. Sui fu jitsu metsu. Ni gon metsu-do.

"As an expedient, therefore, the Tathágata speaks to the monks, saying, "You should know it is a rare thing to live at a time when a Buddha appears in the world. "The reason is that even after the lapse of infinite hundred thousand, ten thousand, hundred thousand aeons, some of the men of little virtue may chance to see a Buddha, but others still may not." Therefore I tell them, "Monks, it is rare that may see the Tathágata" When the people hear these words, they are sure to realize how rare it is to see a Buddha, and then they will yearn and thirst for him. In this way they will plant the cause of enlightenment in their hearts. Therefore the Tathágata announces his own death even though he does not really become extinct."

U zen-nanshi. Sho-butsu nyorai. Ho kai nyo ze. I do shujo. Kai jitsu fu ko.

"You men of devout faith, any teaching of any Buddha is always like this. Since Buddhas reveal their teachings in order to save people all of them are true and none are false."

Hi nyo ro-i. Chi-e so-datsu. Myo ren ho-yaku. Zen ji shubyo. Go nin ta. sho shi-soku. Nyaku ju niju. Nai-shi hyaku-shu. I u ji-en. On shi yo-koku.

"Imagine a wise and skilled physician who can compound medicines to cure any disease. He has many sons, perhaps ten, twenty, ore even a hundred. He goes off to a distant land to see some matter."

Sho shi o go. On ta doku-yaku. Yaku hotsu monran. Enden u ji.

"Later the children drink some kind of poison that makes them wild with pain, and they fall writhing to the ground."

Zeji go bu. Gen rai ki ke. Sho shi on doku Waku shitsu honshin. Waku fu shis sha. Yo ken go bu. Kai dai kangi. Haiki monjin. Zen nan non ki. Gato guchi. Go buku doku-yaku. Gan ken kuryo. Kyo shi jumyo.

"At this time the father comes back to his home and finds that his children have drunk poison. Some are out of their minds while others are not. Seeing their father from afar all are filled with joy and kneel down to entreat him saying, "How wonderful that you have returned safely! We were stupid and by mistake drank some poison. We beg you to cure us and let us live longer." "

Bu ken shi to. Kuno nyo ze. E sho kyobo. Gu ko yaku-so. Shiki ko mimi. Kai shitsu gu-soku. Toshi wago. Yo shi ryo buku. Ni sa ze gon. Shi dai ro-yaku. Shiki ko mimi. Kai shitsu gu-soku. Nyoto ka buku. Soku jo kuno. Mu bu shugen.

"The father seeing his children suffering like this follows various prescriptions. Gathering fine medicinal herbs that are perfect in color fragrance and flavor he grinds sifts and mixes them together. Giving a dose of these to his children he tells them, "This highly beneficial medicine is perfect in color fragrance and flavor. Take it and you will quickly be relieved of your sufferings and will be free of all distress." "

Go sho shi chu. Fu shis shin ja. Ken shi ro-yaku. Shiki ko gu ko. Soku-ben buku shi. Byo jin jo yu. Yo shis shin ja. Ken go bu rai. Sui yak-kangi. Monjin gu-shaku ji byo. Nen yo go yaku. Ni fu ko buku.

"Those children who have not lost their senses can see that the beneficial medicine is good in both color and fragrance, so they take it immediately and are completely cured of their sickness. Those who are out of their minds are equally delighted to see their father return and beg him to cure their sickness but when they are given the medicine they refuse to take it."

Sho-i sha ga. Dokke jinnyu. Ship ponshin ko. O shi ko. Shiki ko yaku. Ni i fu mi. Bu sa ze nen. Shi shi ka min. I doku sho chu. Shin kai tendo. Sui ken ga ki. Gushak kuryo. Nyo ze ko yaku. Ni fu ko buku. Ga kon to setsu hoben. Ryo buku shi yaku. Soku sa ze gon. Nyoto to chi. Ga kon sui ro. Shi ji i shi. Ze ko ro-yaku. Kon ru zai shi. Nyo ka shu buku. Mot^tsu fu sai. Sa ze kyo i. Bu shi ta-koku. Ken shi gen go. Nyo bu i shi.

"This is because the poison has penetrated deeply, causing them to lose their minds. Therefore they think that the medicine will not taste good in spit of its fine color and fragrance. Then the father thinks, "My poor children! The poison has attacked them and completely deranged their minds. Although they are happy to see me and ask me to cure them, they refuse to take this fine medicine I offer them. Now I must use some means to get them to take it." So he tells them this: "Children, listen, I am now old and weak. My life is nearing its end. I leave this good medicine here for you now. You should take it and not worry that it will not cure you." So instructing them, he again goes off to another land, where he sends a messenger home to announce: "Your father is dead." "

Zeji sho shi. Mon bu haiso. Shin dai uno. Ni sa ze nen. Nyaku bu zai sha. Jimin gato. No ken kugo. Konja sha ga. On so ta-koku. Ji yui koro. Mu bu jiko. Jo e hikan. Shin zui shogo. Nai chi shi yaku. Shiki ko mimi. Soku shu buku shi. Doku byo kai yu. Go bu mon shi. Shichi toku sai. Jin ben rai ki. Gen shi ken shi.

"Hearing that their father has deserted them and died, the sons are overcome by anguish and reflect "If our father were alive, he would have pity on us and protect us, but now he has forsaken us and died in some faraway land. We are now mere orphans with no one to rely on." In their incessant grief, they finally awaken. They realize that the medicine actually does possess excellent color, fragrance and favor, and so they take it and are healed of all the effects of the poison."

Sho zen-nanshi. O i unga. Ha u nin no. Sesshi ro-i. Komo zai fu. Hot cha. Seson. Butsu gon. Ga yaku nyo ze. Jo-butsu irai. Muryo muhen. Hyaku sen man noku. Nayuta. Asogi ko. I shujo ko. I hoben-riki. Gon to metsu-do. Yaku mu u no. Nyo ho setsu ga. Komo ka sha.

"Now, men of devout faith, what do you think about this? Can anyone say that this excellent physician is guilty of lying?" "No, World-Honored One." Then the Buddha spoke, saying: "It is the same with me. The time is limitless? A hundred, thousand ten thousand, hundred thousand, nayuta, asogi aeons ?since I attained Buddhahood. For the sake of the people I have used these expedient means telling of my own passing. But no one can reasonably accuse me of lying."

Niji seson. Yoku ju sen shigi. Ni setsu ge gon.

(End of part which may be omitted)

Ji ga toku bur rai. Sho kyo sho kosshu. Muryo hyaku sen man. Oku sai asogi. Jo seppo kyoke Mushu oku shujo. Ryo nyu o butsu-do. Nirai muryo ko.

At that time the World-Honored One, desiring to emphasize this teaching once more, spoke in verse. (Continues to Juryo chapter above)


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METAPHYSICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF LOTUS SUTRA - FROM : SGI BUDDHIST CONCEPTS »

The Lotus Sutra is considered the sutra that fulfills the purpose for Shakyamuni's advent in the world, expressed in these words: "At the start I took a vow, hoping to make all persons equal to me, without any distinction between us." In other words, the purpose of Shakyamuni's advent was to enable all people to attain the same state of perfect enlightenment that caused him to be known as "Buddha," or "awakened one."

The Lotus Sutra contains a number of concepts that were revolutionary both within the context of Buddhist teachings and within the broader social context of the time. Many of these are not stated explicitly but are implied or materialized in the dramatic and even fantastic-seeming events portrayed in the text. Much of the genius of later scholars of the sutra, such as T'ien-t'ai (538-597 C.E.), lay in their ability to extract and systematize these principles.

A core theme of the sutra is the idea that all people equally and without exception possess the "Buddha nature." The message of the Lotus Sutra is to encourage people's faith in their own Buddha nature, their own inherent capacity for wisdom, courage and compassion. The universal capacity for enlightenment is demonstrated through the examples of people for whom this possibility had traditionally been denied, such as women and people who had committed evil deeds.

In many sutras a number of Shakyamuni's senior disciples are condemned as people who have, through arrogant attachment to their intellectual abilities and their self-absorbed practice, "scorched the seeds of their own enlightenment." The profundity of Shakyamuni's teachings in the Lotus Sutra, however, awakens in them the spirit of humility and compassion. They realize that all people are inextricably interlinked in their quest for enlightenment, and that if we desire happiness ourselves, it is imperative that we work for the happiness of others.

In this sutra, moreover, Shakyamuni demonstrates that he actually attained enlightenment in the infinite past, not in his current lifetime as had been assumed by his followers. This illustrates, through the concrete example of his own life, that attaining enlightenment does not mean to change into or become something one is not. Rather, it means to reveal the inherent, "natural" state that already exists within.

As Daisaku Ikeda has written, the Lotus Sutra is ultimately a teaching of empowerment. It "teaches us that the inner determination of an individual can transform everything; it gives ultimate expression to the infinite potential and dignity inherent in each human life."


 

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